Citipower Use Of System Agreement

For large clients that do not exceed these thresholds, dispute resolution mechanisms are generally provided for as part of their follow-up agreements. Companies have a complaints and dispute resolution policy that is available on the internet for all customers. In the absence of an agreement, larger customers can initiate legal proceedings to settle the dispute. Companies believe that agreements are appropriate for larger customers, as issues tend to be more complex and larger customers tend to have better access to business and technical resources and expertise. As regards an open system, the undertakings argue that undertakings are not in a position to issue a specific opinion at this stage without giving details of the scope covered by a new scheme. However, companies find that any proposal for a national framework can lead to a regulatory agreement to compensate for differences in legal systems. Whether these differences will affect companies` financial arrangements and debt instruments will depend on the difference between the proposed regime and the current Victorian regime and the sensitivity of external stakeholders to these changes. Powercor Australia is responsible for the fact that the customer is supplied under Victorian law under the relevant regulatory requirements. It is therefore up to Powercor Australia to negotiate with the relevant intergovernmental distributor to ensure that customer supply complies with relevant Victorian regulatory requirements.

Today, this involves the use of system agreements negotiated between networks. This situation does not need to change under the NCF. – For more information, see: delwp.vic.gov.au/energy/legislation/national-energy-customer-framework/citipower-and-powercor-australia-submission#sthash.7uEuiNua.dpuf Companies are after the opinion that the most appropriate institution to oversee a licensing system is the AEMO. AEMO is an independent institution and companies have confidence in AEMO`s technical capability and deep experience in the sector. As already stated, AEMO currently manages the registration of operators under the NER and has experience in reviewing the prudential requirements to be fulfilled by applicants. Businesses fear that a different wording from the original text has the potential to reconsider predefined policy issues. . . .